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Heritage Designation

HeritageCherry Tree Lodge Sturgeon Point

Our heritage is an important part of all of our communities in Kawartha Lakes. Our historic buildings, villages and landscapes are a vital part of our identity and contribute to our community pride, fascinating history, character, and economic vitality. Throughout the municipality, you will see a wide array of unique heritage resources from our agricultural landscapes to our towns and villages to our industrial past.

Heritage preservation is an important part of the long-term growth of our municipality and a key contributor to our excellent quality of life in Kawartha Lakes. Administered though the Economic Development office, we conserve these resources through property designation, plans and studies, and guidelines for preservation. We administer the Ontario Heritage Act, the provincial legislation which guides heritage preservation in Ontario, and develop policies and guidelines to manage heritage in Kawartha Lakes. We offer a variety of resources for property owners to help them conserve and protect our heritage properties.

 

Heritage Designation

We conserve our heritage resources through heritage designation. Designation recognizes and celebrates important historic properties in Kawartha Lakes and helps manage change to ensure that the important buildings in our communities retain their historic character. Designation may also make properties eligible for financial incentives through our Community Improvement Plan.

Heritage properties are designated individually under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act and are evaluated for designation based on provincial criteria that examine their architectural, historical and contextual value. Property owners can nominate their property for designation by completing our Request for Property Designation form and submitting it to the Economic Development Office.

 Individually Designated Properties

 We have many designated properties throughout Kawartha Lakes each with their own importance and story. You can explore our heritage properties below and access their designating by-laws.

 Bobcaygeon
 
 21 Canal Street East - The Boyd Building
Boyd building with stone wall and archDesignation By-law: 1997-06

 

21 Canal Street, Bobcaygeon, was constructed in 1888 and is the former office of the Mossom Boyd Lumber Company. The building has architectural significance as a good example of stacked plank construction, which is a relatively rare construction method but was commonly used in lumbering towns during the mid-nineteenth century. It also has historical significance because of its connections with the Mossom Boyd Lumber Company. The building is largely intact including original interior doors and woodwork.

 Coboconk
 
 11 Water Street - Coboconk Jail
Coboconk JailDesignation By-law: 1989-40

 

The Coboconk Jail was constructed in 1890 and has significance as the smallest jail in Ontario. Architecturally, it retains it original iron bars and limestone walls, which are two feet thick and were quarried locally in Coboconk. It has significant historical associations with the development and day to day life of the village of Coboconk.

 Fenelon Falls
 
 37 Colborne Street - Old Post Office

Old Fenelon Falls Post officeDesignation By-law: 1981-08 (repealed); 1992-12 (repealed); 2018-142

 

37 Colborne Street was constructed in 1935 as the Fenelon Falls Post Office and was designed by Thomas W. Fuller, the Chief Architect for the federal Department of Public Works from 1927 to 1936. It is architecturally significant because of its clock tower and retained features, such as the stone stating the name of the town, and has contextual significance as the town’s former post office. It is an integral part of the streetscape and a local landmark. 

 72 Francis Street

Wooden gazeboDesignation By-law: 1981-10

 

The gazebo located at 72 Francis Street West in Fenelon Falls is significant as a rare intact example of an early twentieth century gazebo. Constructed in 1904, the gazebo retains its original form and massing including its final and lattice work.

 13 Lindsay Street

13 Lindsay Street Fenelon FallsDesignation By-law: 1979-07 (repealed); 2001-172 (repealed); 2018-143

 

13 Lindsay Street was constructed around 1860 and is significant as the oldest stone structure in Fenelon Falls. It is constructed in the style of an Ontario Gothic cottage with a gable roof, a central gable, central entrance and a symmetrical massing of windows and doors. It is a rare example of this structural type built in stone. The building also has historical significance through its associations with R.C. Smith, a local lumber merchant, and with the Lindsay Light, Heat and Power Company which purchased the building in 1892 to serve as its office. It has contextual significance in its connection to the historic landscape of the Fenelon River.

 103 Lindsay Street - Fenelon Falls Train Station

Fenelon Falls Train stationDesignation By-law: 1983-20

 

The former CNR Railway station in Fenelon Falls was constructed 1885 to replace an older station, constructed in 1876. It is architecturally significant as a representative example of a late nineteenth century rural railway station, as it was constructed in the same style and layout as the other stations along the line that ran from Lindsay to Haliburton which had been completed in 1878. The building has historical significance as the former rail station in the town of Fenelon.

 50 Oak Street - Maryboro Lodge

Maryboro LodgeDesignation By-law: 1979-06

 

Maryboro Lodge in Fenelon Falls was constructed in 1837 and is a significant property in the town, both architecturally and historically. The house is a good example of a Regency-style residence with a wide verandah, large windows, timber construction and roughcast exterior. It was constructed for James Wallis, an Irish immigrant who came to the area in 1834, and named after his father’s estate in Ireland, Maryborough near Glanmure. It is one of a number of large estate houses constructed in the region during this period by upper class immigrants. It was later converted into a boarding house and lodge and became a significant social centre in the town before being converted into a museum in 1963.

13 Short Street

13 Short Street Fenelon FallsDesignation By-law: 1983-19

 

13 Short Street, Fenelon Falls, is a good example of a late nineteenth century Italianate residence. Constructed in 1885, the house has a number of key features of this style including the two storey bay, decorative frieze and brackets. It also features a rare interior spiral staircase.

 52 Somerville 2nd Concession

52 Somerville 2nd ConcessionDesignation By-law: 2019-009

 

The Sellen Log Cabin, located on Fire Route 52, Concession Road 2, is architecturally significant as an excellent example of a traditional and extremely well-preserved log cabin. The cabin is a good example of squared log construction with dovetailed joints. The property also has significant historical value in the history of Somerville Township where it was used as a base for the logging camp on the Burnt River, which was a key part of the area’s early economy. It was also home to the Graham family, some of the earliest settlers in Somerville Township who constructed the property in 1860.

 Janetville
 
 746 Janetville Road

746 Janetville RoadDesignation By-law: 2010-090 (repealed); 2018-144

 

746 Janetville Road was constructed in 1880 and is an excellent example of an Italianate residence. The home, which is a landmark in the local area, is a Georgian-style centre plan house with extensive Italianate and Greek Revival detail including its two Italianate verandahs, window surrounds and brackets. It also retains many of its original interior features such as inlaid flooring, a Jacobean-style staircase, and fireplaces, including an Eastlake fireplace on the second floor. It was constructed for Dr. John McAlpine at a time when Janetville was expected to grow into a significant center with the expansion of the rail line. 

 Kinmount
 
 15 Cluxton Street - Kinmount United Church

Kinmount United ChurchDesignation By-law: 2018-116

 

Kinmount United Church was constructed between 1866 and 1867 and is an important historic structure in the village of Kinmount. The church has important architectural significance as a balloon frame structure, a structural type that had developed in the early to mid-nineteenth century as a more cost effective and easier to erect alternative to post and beam construction. In addition, it retains some important decorative features including the church bell, stained glass, unique wainscoting and globe light fixtures. First constructed as the Presbyterian Church of Scotland, it has historical significance as the oldest publically used building and first church constructed in the community. It is a landmark building in the community, located at the top of East Hill.

 4983 Monck Road

4983 Monck RoadDesignation By-law: 2008-082

 

4983 Monck Road, known locally as Gilmour House, has architectural significance as an excellent example of a vernacular Ontario Gothic Cottage. Constructed in brick, it has the typical centre hall plan with a central gable and rounded window. It retains it front verandah with decorative wooden gingerbread and the decorative bargeboard in the front gable of the house. The house was occupied by Ivy Gilmour from 1930s to the 1950s and was the location of a locally significant event, namely the creation of a quilt to honour the visit of King George VI in 1939.

 4 Station Road - Austin Sawmill

Austin sawmillDesignation By-law: 2000-19

 

The Austin Sawmill is a landmark structure in the village of Kinmount as one of a number of sawmills constructed in the Kinmount area in the nineteenth century and one of the largest in the region. The first sawmill was constructed here in 1874 by William Craig and John Austin; the current sawmill, constructed in 1942, is the third on this site after the first two burned down in 1908 and 1942 respectively. The sawmill is an important structure in the history of the village, because of the importance of the local lumbering industry which drove the growth of the town beginning in the nineteenth century. It also has historical connections to the Austin family who operated the mill.

 5 Station Road - Kinmount Railway Station

Kinmount Railway StationDesignation By-law: 2000-20

 

The Kinmount Rail Station was constructed in 1876 as part of the expansion of the rail system from Lindsay to Haliburton in the late 1870s. It is architecturally significant as a surviving example of the rail stations constructed on this line in the late 1870s which were all constructed on a standard plan by Sir William Mackenzie of Kirkfield. The station has historical and contextual value as the key transportation hub in the village of Kinmount and remains an important landmark in the community.

 Lindsay
 
 23 Adelaide Street North

23 Adelaide Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1990-71 (repealed); 2018-145

 

23 Adelaide Street North was constructed in the mid- nineteenth century and is a good example of an Italianate residence. It includes a number of features commonly found on Italianate houses during this time period, including ornate window hoods, a hipped roof with wide eaves, and decorative brackets. The house also retains a front verandah with chamfered columns and decorative woodwork. Historically, the house has association with John Langton who originally owned the property, and Dr. Joshua Fidler, a local doctor and coroner who contributed significantly to the religious life of Lindsay in the mid-nineteenth century. It forms part of a wider Victorian residential streetscape and maintains the character of the local area.

 28 Albert Street South

28 Albert Street SouthDesignation By-law: 1990-10 (repealed); 2018-147

 

28 Albert Street South is a good example of a Queen Anne style house. Constructed in 1875, the property has architectural value through its use of the typical asymmetrical massing and eclectic design that characterized this style in the late nineteenth century. Its most prominent feature is its turreted tower. Other key features include the decorative bargeboard, shingled gable, and brackets.

 55 Albert Street North

55 Albert Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1985-15 (repealed); 2018-146

 

55 Albert Street North is an excellent example of a stone Ontario Gothic cottage. Originally constructed on a farm west of Oakwood and moved to Lindsay in 1934, the house retains key original features that characterize the Ontario Gothic style including the centre gable with lancet window; central entrance with sidelights and transom; and decorative gingerbread with drop finial.

 57 Albert Street North

57 Albert Street NorthDesignation By-law: 2016-032

 

57 Albert Street North was constructed in 1933 and is a representative example of an interwar Colonial Revival house. The house, which was designed by Peterborough architect John Hornsby, retains a number of key features that characterize this style including the entrance with Classical portico; half-moon windows on the gable end; gable roof; and symmetrically placed chimneys. The house also has historical value as the home of Dr. H.D. Logan, who became mayor in 1937, and his son, Judge H.D. Logan. It maintains the character of the streetscape which is characterized by larger homes from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

 40 Bond Street West

40 Bond Street WestDesignation By-law: 1991-24 (repealed); 2018-148

 

40 Bond Street West was likely constructed around 1870 and is a good example of a buff brick Victorian house. It integrates elements that were popular in a number of different styles during this period including its decorative hood moulds, drop finial and bay window. It also retains a Classical verandah, likely added around the turn of the century.

 46 Bond Street West

46 Bond Street WestDesignation By-law: 1985-42 (repealed); 2018-149

 

46 Bond Street West was constructed in 1853 and has important architectural and historical significance to the town of Lindsay. It is an excellent and intact example of a Regency cottage, a rare house type in this area, and retains key features of this architectural style including: single-storey construction with a hipped roof; symmetrically massing; and French doors. The house also had historical significance as it was built by Captain Charles Rubidge for his sister; Rubidge was a crown land agent based in Peterborough responsible for several townships in the Newcastle District and wrote extensively about emigration and settlement in Upper Canada in the 1830s.

 54 Bond Street West

54 Bond street WestDesignation By-law: 1987-48 (repealed); 2018-150

 

54 Bond Street West in Lindsay was constructed in 1875 and is an excellent, representative example of a Queen Anne style residence. It demonstrates many of the key design ideas prevalent in the Queen Anne style, including the eclecticism and asymmetry associated with this residential design type. Important features including: the turreted tower; the wraparound verandah with paired columns; a two-storey bay and gable; stained glass transoms; chimneys; and stone archway. It maintains the character of the streetscape which features historic homes, many of which are on large lots with the house set back from the street.

 60 Bond Street West

60 Bond Street WestDesignation By-law: 1994-055 (repealed); 2018-151

 

60 Bond Street West is a good example of an Italianate house constructed in the late nineteenth century. Built around 1875, it is constricted on a symmetrical Georgian plan with a central entrance and includes a number of important features which mark it as an Italianate structure. These include the hipped roof with wide eaves; windows with hood moulds; brackets; and verandah with pediment. The house has historical value through its first inhabitant, John McLennan, who was the Sherriff of Victoria County from 1875 to 1915. It maintains the character of the streetscape which features historic homes, many of which are on large lots with the house set back from the street.

 78 Bond Street West

78 Bond Street WestDesignation By-law: 1991-25 (repealed); 2018-152

 

78 Bond Street West was constructed in 1870 and is a good example of an Italianate House. Constructed on a Georgian plan with a central entrance and symmetrical massing, the house is notable for its buff brick details including the quoins and window hoods. It has historical associations with local merchant James Lovell, its first occupant, who worked as a saddle and harness maker in Lindsay in the late nineteenth century.

 9 Cambridge Street North - Lindsay Fire Hall

Lindsay Fire HallDesignation By-law: 1985-38

 

The Lindsay Fire Hall is an important, landmark building in the town of Lindsay. A fire brigade was established in the town in the 1860s after the fire of 1861 that devastated large sections of the downtown and was housed in a variety of buildings. The current fire hall was constructed in 1901 as part of a wider program of municipal civic improvements around the turn of the century. The building is architecturally significant for its prominent tower as well as other prominent Edwardian features such as the front gable and rounded windows. The building has contextual significance as part of the historic civic precinct in downtown Lindsay comprised of the fire hall, town hall, the library, armoury and Victoria Park. 

 28 Cambridge Street North - Cambridge Street Baptist Church

Cambridge Street Baptist ChurchDesignation By-law: 2015-194

 

Cambridge Street Baptist Church was constructed in 1872 and is an excellent example of a Gothic Revival style church. The church is a good example of the use of the Gothic Revival style by a non-conformist denomination which, in general, often used more simplified version of this style and it reflects a type of church design that was prevalent in this period which included a gable front with central tower and spire. This church is notable for its buff brick details, unique spire with tin work and stained glass. The church is a landmark structure that originally housed Lindsay’s first town clock in its tower.

 31 Cambridge Street North

31 Cambridge Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1988-86 (repealed); 2018-153

 

31 Cambridge Street North has heritage value as a representative and unique example of a gable front Victorian house. Constructed in 1871, it features the typical one and a half storeys of this house type with an offset entrance and sash windows. It demonstrates a high level of craftsmanship in its decorative bargeboard, ornate verandah, and entrance. The house has important historical associations with local artist and writer W.A. Goodwin whose paintings and writings give significant insight into life in the area in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

 51 Cambridge Street North

51 Cambridge Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1994-017 (repealed); 2018-154

 

51 Cambridge Street North is a unique example of a Queen Anne style house in Lindsay. Constructed in 1888, it features the typical asymmetry and eclectic design of the Queen Anne style; the eclectic elements in this house include: decorative hood moulds; decorative wooden bargeboard with a drop finial; and oversized decorative brackets. The house has historical value through one of its occupants, George Wilson, who owned the home from 1898 to 1954 and was the publisher of the Lindsay Daily Post. The property is a contributing feature to the historic landscape of Cambridge Street North.

 58 Cambridge Street North

58 Cambridge Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1988-87 (repealed); 2018-155

 

58 Cambridge Street North is an excellent example of a Queen Anne style house in Lindsay. Constructed in 1880, the house demonstrates the typical asymmetrical massing and eclecticism of the Queen Ann style. The house particularly notable for its half timbered gables with pebbledash finish; two-storey bay; decorative bargeboard and wooden trim; and its verandah with Eastlake-style woodwork. It forms part of a three building row of similar houses on the east side of Cambridge Street North, all constructed around the same period in this style.

 4 Colborne Street East

4 Colborne Street EastDesignation By-law: 2012-221 (repealed); 2018-156

 

4 Colborne Street East in Lindsay is a unique example of a Queen Anne style house. The property, which was constructed in 1890 for Isabel and Freemont Crandel, demonstrates the typical asymmetrical massing and eclectic design elements of this style. Unique elements of the house include: a tower with mansard roof and decorative dormer window surround; wraparound verandah with Doric columns; two-storey bay; shingled gable; and decorative bargeboard. The interior also retains some of its original elements including its curved staircases and wood flooring.

 22 Elgin Street

22 Elgin StreetDesignation By-law: 1994-097 (repealed); 2018-157

 

22 Elgin Street in Lindsay is a good example of an Ontario Gothic cottage. The house is a representative example of this structural type and retains the key elements which define the style. These include the gable roof; central gable with window; central entrance; and rear kitchen addition. The house also has a number of unique and important decorative elements such as the moulded brick window hoods, the verandah with turned columns and decorative woodwork and the entrance surround with transom and sidelights.

 19 Francis Street

19 Francis StreetDesignation By-law: 1989-01 (repealed); 2018-158

 

19 Francis Street is an excellent example of an Edwardian Classical house. The property, which was constructed around 1900, retains key elements of the Edwardian Classical style. These include: the hipped roof; the shingled front gable with tripartite window; the frieze with dentils and brackets; the upper storey bay windows; the picture window with coloured glass transom and sidelights; and the wraparound verandah with columns, entablature and piers. The property maintains the historic character of the surrounding neighbourhood which is comprised primarily of nineteenth and early twentieth century homes.

 21 Francis Street

21 Francis StreetDesignation By-law: 1989-19 (repealed); 2018-159

 

21 Francis Street is an excellent example of an Edwardian Classical house. Constructed in 1900, the house has a number of key features which identify it as this stylistic type which was becoming popular around the time it was constructed. Some of the key features include the hipped roof; the front gable with shingles and tripartite window; the frieze with dentils and brackets; the picture window with coloured glass transom and sidelights; and the verandah with columns, entablature and piers. This property is particularly notable for its upper storey window which is framed by four pilasters. The property maintains the historic character of the surrounding neighbourhood which is comprised primarily of nineteenth and early twentieth century homes.

 26 Francis Street - City Hall

City HallDesignation By-law: 1986-27

 

26 Francis Street, the current City Hall for the City of Kawartha Lakes, has important architectural and historical value. The building was constructed in 1863 as the Courthouse for the newly created County of Victoria and has evolved as one of the key civic and institutional structures in Lindsay. It was designed by Toronto architectural firm Cumberland and Storm, which also designed Osgoode Hall. It is an excellent example of a Neoclassical judicial building and retains many of the key features of this architectural type. These include: the pedimented façade with cornice and brackets; pilasters; rounded windows; coursing; and a rusticated foundation.

 9 Glenelg Street East

9 Glenelg Street EastDesignation By-law: 1985-23 (repealed); 2018-160

 

9 Glenelg Street was constructed around 1870 and is a representative example of an Italianate style residence. The house is constructed on a Georgian plan with a central entrance and has a number of features typical of this style including the hipped roof, wide eaves and symmetrical massing. The property is notable for its elaborate verandah which includes grouped columns, decorative brackets, and dentils as well as its entrance surround with transom and sidelights. The property has historic value as the home of John Kennedy and his son Peter, who both served as treasurer for the Township of Ops.

 2 Kent Street West

2 Kent Street WestDesignation By-law: 1990-11 (repealed); 2018-161

 

2 Kent Street West in Lindsay is a representative example of a Victorian commercial block with features that set it apart from many of the other commercial structures from this period in Lindsay’s downtown. Like much of the downtown, it was constructed in the 1860s after the 1861 fire that destroyed much of the town’s centre. The building is a simplified version of the Italianate commercial style that became popular during this period and includes decorative features such as brackets, dentils and quoins, but is unique for its use of a hipped, as opposed to flat, roof. The property is notable for its intact storefronts including recessed entrances and large windows with muntin bars. It has contextual significance as part of the row of two- and three storey commercial buildings that characterizes Lindsay’s downtown.

 3 Kent Street West

3 Kent Street WestDesignation By-law: 1988-48 (repealed); 2018-162

 

3 Kent Street West is a representative example of a Victorian commercial block constructed in the Italianate style. Like most of the buildings in the downtown, it was constructed after the 1861 fire that destroyed much of downtown Lindsay and resulted in the reconstruction of the streetscape in this style. 3 Kent Street West is a three-storey Italianate structure with notable features that include its decorative brickwork, pilasters, rounded central windows with hoods and keystones, and its storefront. The property contributes to the overall streetscape of downtown Lindsay which is comprised primarily of two- and three-storey commercial structures in this style.

 171 Kent Street West

171 Kent Street WestDesignation By-law: 1981-03

 

The Grand Hotel, at 171 Kent Street West, is a rare example of a Second Empire style commercial building in Lindsay. Typical of the Second Empire style, the structure has a mansard roof with decorative dormer windows. The property also features pilasters; decorative brickwork including dentils; an upper and lower storey arched entrance and a recessed lower storey. The property appears to have always been operated as a hotel, at least as far back as 1875 which is likely soon after it was constructed. It is a contributing property to the historic landscape of downtown Lindsay.

 180 Kent Street West - Lindsay Town Hall

Lindsay Town HallDesignation By-law: 1981-04

 

180 Kent Street West is the former Lindsay Town Hall and is a good example of a mid-nineteenth century institutional building constructed using Classical features. The building was designed by Toronto architect William Kauffman in 1864 with an addition the following year by Thomas Bradburn. Key architectural features of the building include: its grouped rounded windows and doors with moulded hoods; the belfry; pilasters; coursing; and the projecting bay with rusticated entrance. The property has significant historical value as Lindsay’s Town Hall beginning in the mid-nineteenth century and contextual significance as both a landmark building and as part of the downtown civic precinct which includes the town hall, library, armoury, fire hall and Victoria Park.

 190 Kent Street West - Lindsay Public Library

Lindsay Public LibraryDesignation By-law: 1988-39

 

190 Kent Street West has architectural and historical significance as one of the earliest Carnegie libraries in Canada. Constructed between 1902 and 1902, it was designed by Toronto architect George Martell Miller in the Beaux Arts style typical of the Carnegie libraries. Some of its key architectural features include: the portico with pediment, frieze, paired Doric columns, and rusticated piers and stairway; the rusticated foundation; the windows with decorative surrounds; corner quoins; and symmetrical massing. The property has contextual significance part of downtown Lindsay’s historic civic precinct which also include the armoury, town hall, fire station and Victoria Park.

 210 Kent Street West - Lindsay Armoury

Lindsay ArmouryDesignation By-law: 1980-03

 

The Lindsay Armoury was constructed in 1913 and has significance as an excellent example of an early twentieth century armoury. Constructed as part of the wave of drill hall building initiated in the early twentieth century by Sir Sam Hughes, Minister of Militia and Defense during the First World War and the local MP, it is constructed in a version of the Romanesque Revival style that was frequently used for drill halls at this type and drew heavily from the fortified architecture of Norman England. Its key architectural features which mark it as this structural type include: heavy massing; crenelated towers; buttresses; and rusticated foundation, door and windows surrounds, and coping. It is a landmark building and a key part of Lindsay’s historic civic precinct which includes the armoury, the library, the old town hall, the fire hall and Victoria Park.

 2 Lindsay Street South - The Academy Theatre

Academy TheatreDesignation By-law: 1980-02 (repealed); 2018-163

 

The Academy Theatre, located at 2 Lindsay Street South, has heritage value as a historic venue for arts and culture in Lindsay. The building was constructed in 1892 as a theatre called the Academy of Music and the first performance took place in January 1893. It was also one of the original silent movie houses in Ontario outside of Toronto. The building is a good example of a simplified Romanesque Revival building with a parapet gable, chimneys and windows with lintels and lug sills and was designed by Peterborough architect William Blackwell who was one of the first architects to use the Romanesque Revival style in central Ontario. The theatre is a contributing structure to the historic character of downtown Lindsay and a local landmark.

 10 Lindsay Street South

10 Lindsay Street SouthDesignation By-law: 1995-038

 

10 Lindsay Street South is an excellent, representative example of an Italianate commercial building in downtown Lindsay. Constructed in 1863 as part of the reconstructed of the downtown, it retains important and unique details that are consistent with this building style. These include the brick cornice with decorative brickwork and central arch, the rounded second and third storey windows grouped between pilasters, and ground floor storefront. It has historical significance as the home of one of Lindsay’s first newspapers, The Canadian Press, which located to the town in the 1860s from Beaverton. It is a landmark building in downtown Lindsay and contributes to the historic character of the streetscape through its continuation of the dominant style and massing of the surrounding structures and as part of the Kent Street terminal vista.

 41 Melbourne Street West

41 Melbourne Street WestDesignation By-law: 2019-080

 

41 Melbourne Street West is an excellent example of a Queen Anne Revival style house constructed in wood. It is unique in its constructed material as the vast majority of Queen Anne houses in the local area are constructed from brick. It has a number of important features that identify it as being of this style including the asymmetrical massing; corner turret with awning roof; decorative woodwork in the gable; entrance porch; and front bay window with brackets and hood. It is contributing property to the historic landscape of Melbourne Street.

 29 Regent Street

29 Regent StreetDesignation By-law: 1992-76 (repealed); 2018-164

 

29 Regent Street, Lindsay was constructed in 1875 and is a representative example of a vernacular hipped roof dwelling from this period. The house includes important, retained features of this house type such as a hipped roof, moulded window hoods, and an offset entrance with transom and sidelights. The property is notable for its intact verandah with square columns, brackets and decorative woodwork. It is a contributing property to the historic character of Regent Street.

 46 Regent Street

46 Regent StreetDesignation By-law: 2013-102 (repealed); 2018-165

 

46 Regent Street, Lindsay is an excellent, intact example of an Regency cottage. Constructed in 1874, the house retains many of its original features on both the exterior and interior of the building. Exterior features which mark it as a Regency cottage include: the hipped roof; symmetrical massing; one-storey construction; quoins; rounded windows with voussoirs; central entrance with transom and sidelights; and the Classical entrance porch. The house also retains many original interior features including original woodwork, moulding, wainscoting, and parlour fireplace. The house has historic significance as it was reportedly used as a ticket office for the rail line that ran along Victoria Avenue in the nineteenth century. It is a contributing property to the historic character of Regent Street.

 63 Regent Street

63 Regent StreetDesignation By-law: 1983-09 (repealed); 2018-166

 

63 Regent Street, Lindsay has architectural value as a representative example of an Ontario Gothic cottage. Constructed in 1870 by William Laidley, the house demonstrates the key elements of the Ontario Gothic cottage style. These include: a gable roof; a central gable with rounded window; buff brick quoins and details; symmetrical massing; central entrance with transom and sidelights; and verandah. The verandah is a particularly notable feature of this property with an awning roof, chamfered columns, and decorative brackets.  It contributes to the historic character of the local neighbourhood.

 10 Russell Street East

10 Russell Street EastDesignation By-law: 1986-05 (repealed); 2018-168

 

10 Russell Street East is a unique example of an Ontario Gothic cottage in Lindsay. The property features many of the typical characteristics of the style including the symmetrical massing, the central entrance with sidelights and transom, central gable and decorative bargeboard. The house is unique because of its projecting front gable and Classical entrance porch. The property has important historical significance through William Needler, who built the house. Needler was a key figure in the early development of Lindsay, arriving in 1862 and building a mill and donating the property for St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church and Sunday School.

 12 Russell Street East

12 Russell Street EastDesignation By-law: 1987-06 (repealed); 2018-169

 

12 Russell Street East is an excellent example of a Georgian building in Lindsay. Constructed in 1853, the property demonstrates the key characteristics of the Georgian style including a central hall plan, a hipped roof; windows with hood moulds; pilasters; a projecting front bay with pediment; and a Classical entrance porch. It has historical significance as the location of the first bank in Lindsay with the Bank of Upper Canada opening in this location in 1853. It subsequently housed the Ontario Bank before becoming a private residence in 1873.

 29 Russell Street East - St. Mary's Catholic Church

St. Mary's Catholic ChurchDesignation By-law: 1984-34 (repealed); 2018-170

 

St. Mary’s Catholic Church, located at 29 Russell Street East, is an excellent example of a Gothic Revival ecclesiastical building and is the oldest church in Lindsay. Constructed in 1858, the church demonstrates the key features of a Gothic Revival church with a frontal tower and spire, a design that was popular in towns and cities at this time. Important defining features of the building include: the lancet windows and doors; the buttresses; the bell tower with rose windows; and the spire. The spire, which was added in 1884, is a notable and recognizable feature in the streetscape of downtown Lindsay with its tin exterior, cross and decorative details. The church has important historical associations with the history of the Catholic community in the town and it is a landmark building in Lindsay.

 45 Russell Street East

45 Russell Street EastDesignation By-law: 1990-70

 

45 Russell Street East has historical and architectural significance as an early building in the town of Lindsay and one of the first houses built on Russell Street. The house is a representative example of a mid-Victorian residence that uses Gothic Revival elements such as the gable roof and cross-gable plan. The property has some unique architectural elements including the verandah with decorative woodwork and the side bay with gingerbread, a drop finial and windows with moulded hoods. It has historical significance because the house was constructed by James Knowlson by his father John, who was one of the founders of the Lindsay land tract.

 45 Russell Street West - St. Paul's Anglican Church

St. Paul's Anglican ChurchDesignation By-law: 2018-167

 

45 Russell Street East has historical and architectural significance as an early building in the town of Lindsay and one of the first houses built on Russell Street. The house is a representative example of a mid-Victorian residence that uses Gothic Revival elements such as the gable roof and cross-gable plan. The property has some unique architectural elements including the verandah with decorative woodwork and the side bay with gingerbread, a drop finial and windows with moulded hoods. It has historical significance because the house was constructed by James Knowlson by his father John, who was one of the founders of the Lindsay land tract.

 17 Sussex Street North

17 Sussex Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1984-26 (repealed); 2018-141

 

17 Sussex Street North was constructed in 1900 and has both architectural and historical significance. It is a good example of a turn of the century home built in the English cottage style. The defining architectural attributes of the house are its cross-gable plan with steep roofs, asymmetrical massing and decorative details, such as the brackets on the side entrance, which are reminiscent of vernacular English design. The property has important historical associations in the town of Lindsay as the home of Leslie M. and Gertrude Frost, who purchased the house in 1941. Leslie M. Frost served as the MP for Victoria-Haliburton beginning in 1937 until 1961, becoming premier of Ontario in 1949. He lived in the house until his death in 1973.

 37-39 Sussex Street North

37-39 Sussex Street NorthDesignation By-law: 2015-141

 

37-39 Sussex Street North has historical and architectural significance as the first Baptist church constructed in Lindsay. Known originally as the Wellington Street Chapel, the church was built in 1867 using frame construction by a local contractor; the church was painted by a group of volunteers that fall. This structure was typical of early chapels constructed by small congregations during this period with timber log beams, which have been retained, a steep gable roof, and few decorative features. The Baptist congregation occupied this building until 1885 when they purchased the current church on Cambridge Street and the chapel was converted into a semi-detached dwelling. The property has significant historical associations with the growth of the Baptist community in Lindsay.

 45 Victoria Avenue North

45 Victoria Avenue NorthDesignation By-law: 1988-85 (repealed); 2018-171

 

45 Victoria Avenue North is a unique example of a Second Empire style residence in Lindsay. Constructed in 1880 by Thomas Bradburn, the house is an excellent example of the use of the Second Empire style in large estate houses during this period. It features the typical mansard roof with dormer windows of this style as well as many important and retained decorative elements. These include: a cornice with dentils; brackets; decorative brickwork such as coursing and window hoods; and the verandah with wooden columns and brackets.

 50 Victoria Avenue North - Old Lindsay Gaol

Old Lindsay GaolDesignation By-law: 2000-68

 

The Old Lindsay Gaol is an important institutional building in the history of Lindsay and a recognized local landmark. The jail was completed in 1863 and designed by Toronto architect William Storm who also designed the neighbouring Court House (now City Hall) at the same time. The building is typical of nineteenth century jail design with large, imposing limestone walls and Classical design features including the symmetrical massing, rounded windows and doors, and rusticated stonework. The building has significant historical associations because of its former role as the jail in the town of Lindsay constructed as part of the creation of the independent County of Victoria in 1863.

 86 Wellington Street

86 Wellington StreetDesignation By-law: 1988-01

 

86 Wellington Street is an representative example of a late nineteenth century vernacular residence with Queen Anne Revival details. It is constructed on an L-shaped plan with steep gables and rounded windows. Its most notable feature is its wraparound verandah on two sides of the building which features decorative Eastlake-style woodwork and a bandshell corner. The property maintains and supports the heritage character of the local neighbourhood.

 8-12 William Street South

8 William Street SouthDesignation By-law: 1988-84 (repealed); 2018-174

 

8-12 William Street is a good example of a commercial building in Lindsay’s downtown core. The property was likely constructed in the mid- to late nineteenth century as part of a larger block on William Street South. The brick building retains its decorative details including rusticated quoins and band of corbels and dentil below the roofline. It is a contributing property to the historic landscape and commercial character of downtown Lindsay.

 37 William Street North

37 William Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1993-01 (repealed); 2018-172

 

37 William Street North has architectural and historical value and is an important building in downtown Lindsay. Likely constructed in the 1880s, it is an excellent example of a Second Empire style commercial block. The property features the typical mansard roof with dormer windows of this style and is particularly notable for the high level of craftsmanship exhibited in the dormer windows which retain their elaborate decorative surrounds. The property also retains its decorative brickwork below the cornice line and above the second storey windows. The property was originally the Tremont Hotel and is a contributing property to the downtown streetscape of Lindsay’s historic commercial core.

 73 William Street South

73 William Street SouthDesignation By-law: 1992-38 (repealed); 2018-173

 

73 William Street South has architectural significance as a representative example of a mid-Victorian home with Italianate details. The house is built on an L-shaped, cross-gable plan with steeply pitched roofs and buff brick. It is notable for its decorative features which are executed with a high degree of craftsmanship. These include: rusticated quoins; moulded window hoods and surrounds; the canted bay window; and entrance.

 155 William Street North

155 William Street NorthDesignation By-law: 1988-50

 

155 William Street North is a unique example of a Queen Anne Revival style house in Lindsay and has both architectural and historical significance. Constructed in 1908, the house is a typical Queen Anne Revival style estate house and its architectural elements make it representative of this style. Its is notable for its corner tower with awning roof, windows with lintels and lug sills, prominent dormers, classical entrance porch and oculus window. The house has historical significance as the home of local lumber merchant and politician John Carew. Carew was an important figure in the turn of the century business community in Lindsay and served as MP for Victoria South between 1914 and 1919.

 Little Britain
 
 166-168 Ramsay Road

166 Ramsay RoadDesignation By-law: 1997-10 (repealed); 2018-176

 

166-168 Ramsay Road in Little Britain, also known as Beecroft Farm, has historical and architectural significance as an early homestead in the former Victoria County. The farmhouse on the property is a unique example of an Ontario Gothic cottage constructed of frame constructed and clad in block coursed ashlar, which is uncommon in the local region. Constructed after 1861 to replace an older log structure, the house retains the key elements of this house style including its central gable with decorative bargeboard and drop finial, central lancet window and central entrance with transom and sidelights. Historically, the property has important associations with the early settlement of Mariposa Township as the land was originally granted to  Joseph Sheffield who sold the land to John Beecroft in 1847.
 704 Fingerboard Road - Salem United Church

Salem United ChurchDesignation By-law: 2005-154 (repealed); 2018-175

 

Salem United Church was constructed in 1885 as the Salem Methodist Church. The building is an excellent example of a rural church constructed using simplified Gothic Revival forms. The building itself is designed on a basic rectangular plan with a central lancet doorway and four bays with lancet windows. The church is minimal in its decorative elements, reflecting the general approach to many rural Methodist churches at this time, with the primary decoration coming from the buff brick quoins, pilasters, and polychromatic window hoods. The property is a landmark building in the local area and, historically, an important meeting point for the local Methodist congregation and community.

 1201 Salem Road

1201 Salem RoadDesignation By-law: 1995-26 (repealed); 2018-177

 

1201 Salem Road is a rare and unique example of a Queen Anne style property in Little Britain. The house is unique in its interpretation of the Queen Anne style through its use of a central entrance flanked by two two-storey bays and gables. The house exhibits a high level of craftsmanship throughout, but particularly in the treatment of the gables which feature carved, decorative bargeboard, brackets, fish scale shingles and central windows with decorative surrounds.

 Manilla
 
 17025 Simcoe Street - Manilla Public Library

Manilla Public LibraryDesignation By-law: 1996-36 (repealed); 2018-178

 

17025 Simcoe Street South, which has been occupied by the Manilla Public Library since 1913, has important architectural and historical value in the community of Manilla. The building was constructed in 1850 as a residence and is an excellent example of a vernacular Neoclassical structure. Constructed on a rectangular layout, the building is characterized by its symmetrical massing and minimal decoration with the exception of the front entrance surround which is in the Classical style. The building has significant associations with the Manilla Public Library which formed in 1895 and had the building donated to it in 1913. It is an important building in the community of Manilla.
 Norland
 
 3449 Monck Road - Norland School

Norland SchoolDesignation By-law: 2011-258

 

The former Norland School, or S.S.#1 Laxton, was constructed around 1908 to replace an earlier wooden structure. The building is an excellent example of a rural school house and unique in its stone construction which used both limestone and granite, a both types of stone are found in the local area. Although the building has undergone a number of changes, it retains many of its important original design elements including the wooden belfry, arched tripartite front window and lintels and voussoirs. It has important historical associations in the community of Norland as the community school and is a recognizable, landmark structure.

 Oakwood
 
 430 Taylors Road

430 Taylors RoadDesignation By-law: 1993-19 (repealed); 2018-181

 

430 Taylor’s Road, Oakwood is an excellent example of a nineteenth century Italianate farmhouse. Likely constructed in the late nineteenth century, it is built on a symmetrical Georgian centre hall plan with a central entrance and hipped roof. The house includes a number of decorative elements typical of this house type including buff brick quoins and doors and window surrounds, coursing, and brackets. The house is particularly notable for its restored belvedere cupola located on top of the house.
 977 Eldon Road

977 Eldon RoadDesignation By-law: 1992-04 (repealed); 2018-179

 

Cameron’s Store was constructed in 1864 by Archibald E. Cameron and has architectural and historical importance in the community of Oakwood. It is a good example of a mid-nineteenth century gable front structure. Constructed on a cross gable plan, the building has distinctive buff brick quoins and voussoirs and return eaves. It is an important structure in the development of the commercial core of Oakwood and a part of the community’s historic streetscape.

 949 Highway 7 - Oakwood United Church

Oakwood United ChurchDesignation By-law: 1992-22 (repealed); 2018-180

 

Oakwood United Church was constructed in 1912 and is an excellent example of an early twentieth century Gothic Revival church which drew from the Baronial Gothic tradition. The exterior of the church is defined by its two asymmetrical frontal towers with crenelated tops. As with other churches constructed in this tradition, the church employs heavy massing and rustication at the foundation and in the window surrounds. The building is particularly notable for its significant collection of stained glass which are sourced from the Toronto Plate Glass Importing Company. The church was originally built as the Methodist church and is an important structure in both the religious and community life of Oakwood. It is a landmark structure in the community and a contributing structure to the historic streetscape along Highway 7.
 Omemee
 
 1 King Street West - Coronation Hall

Coronation HallDesignation By-law: 2003-38

 

Coronation Hall was constructed in 1911 and has significant architectural, historical and contextual importance in the village of Omemee. The building is an excellent example of an early twentieth century music hall and is also a rare example of a Prairie style building in Ontario. The building displays key elements of the Prairie style including its flat roof, wide eaves, combination of stucco and brick in a neutral colour palette, and horizontal bands of windows. Like most examples of Canadian Prairie style architecture, it differs from its American counterparts because it has a more vertical massing but still reflects the horizontal lines that characterize this style. The property has an important association with Flora McCrae Eaton, Lady Eaton, who was born in Omemee and who donated the building to serve as the village’s town hall and performance centre. It is named in honour of the 1911 coronation of King George V and Queen Mary. The property is an important landmark building on the main street of Omemee.

4249 Highway 7 - Emily Cemetery Chapel

Emily Cemetery ChapelDesignation By-law: 2000-14

 

The Emily Cemetery Chapel is an excellent and representative example of a cemetery chapel constructed in the English Gothic style. It retains many of its original features that are key aspects of this architectural type including its stone wall structure, lancet windows, and bell-cote. The building has historical significance as part of the Emily Cemetery which opened in 1872 when the community identified the need for a non-denominational buried ground. The chapel was constructed in 1929 and donated to the cemetery by Flora McCrae Eaton, Lady Eaton, as a memorial to her family and was originally named the McCrea Memorial Chapel. Lady Eaton was born in Omemee in 1880 and is an important figure locally because of her significant impact on the architectural development of Omemee in the early twentieth century.  The property has contextual significance as a defining built feature of the Emily Cemetery and as a local landmark in Emily Township.

 Pontypool
 
 25 Pontypool Road - Pontypool Grain Elevator

Pontypool Grain ElevatorDesignation By-law: 2011-257

 

The Pontypool Grain Elevator has significant architectural and historical importance in the village of Pontypool. The elevator was constructed in the early 1900s and is only one of two surviving freestanding grain elevators from this period in Ontario. Built of post and beam constructed with an exterior cladding of plank and cedar shingles, it was erected by the Good Grain Company and facilitated the movement of local agricultural good along the Canadian Pacific Railway. It is an important marker of the agricultural history of Pontypool and Manvers Township and it is a well-known local landmark.

 637 Ballyduff Road - Ballyduff Presbyterian Church

Ballyduff Presbyterian ChurchDesignation By-law: 2016-031

 

Ballyduff Presbyterian Church was constructed in 1853 and is the oldest church in Manvers Township. It is an excellent example of a mid-century rural church that integrated both Georgian and Gothic elements into a simple design that was consistent with Presbyterian aesthetics during this period. It features both return eaves and lancet windows which are indicative of the two different architectural styles respectively and a simple interior that retains its original tin ceiling. It is an important building in the early history of the community of Ballyduff and a local landmark.

 1185 Ballyduff Road

1185 Ballyduff RoadDesignation By-law: 2007-124 (repealed); 2018-182

 

1185 Ballyduff Road, known as Fallingbrook Farm, is significant because it houses an example of a mid-nineteenth century Ontario Gothic farmhouse. Architecturally, the property displays the key characteristics of this house type including: the gable roof; centre gable with lancet window; central entrance with transom and sidelights; and verandah with columns and decorative wooden brackets. The property was settled in 1844 by William Fallis and his family, immigrants from Ireland and the brick and timber for the construction of the house were made and harvested on the property. The Fallis family was one of the first families to settle in Manvers and the property is an important part of the township’s early history.

 Sturgeon Point
 
 119 Irene Avenue - Sturgeon Point Union Church

Sturgeon Point Union ChurchDesignation By-law: 1993-12 (repealed); 2018-183

 

Sturgeon Point Union Church has important architectural, historical and contextual value. Architecturally, it is one of the few octagonal structures in Kawartha Lakes and is of a unique post and beam structure with a central pillar and windows on seven sides of the structure. It has historical and contextual value as part of the historic community of Sturgeon Point and was funded by one of its early cottaging families, the Flavelles. It is a landmark building and an important part of the community’s historic landscape.

 Rain Shelter

Sturgeon Point Rain ShelterDesignation By-law: 2007-06 (repealed); 2018-184

 

The Sturgeon Point rain shelter is a rare, intact example of an Edwardian rain shelter constructed as a passenger waiting area for steamboat transport. Constructed around 1903, it has significant historical connections to the history of steamboats in the Kawartha Lakes and their importance in the growth of Sturgeon Point as a holiday destination in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

 Woodville
 
 56 King Street

56 King StreetDesignation By-law: 2010-092

 

56 King Street was constructed in Woodville in 1837 and is an excellent, representative example of a Georgian-style house. It features a number of important historic architectural attributes including its chimneys, windows, and return eaves. The property has also retained a number of original interior features which include three fireplaces, original pine floors, original Peter Robinson windows, and a spiral staircase. The property also has historical significance as the Presbyterian manse in the community of Woodville and contextual significance as part of the historic landscape of King Street and in its links to the former Presbyterian church.

 100A King Street

Woodville Town HallDesignation By-law: 2012-220

 

100A King Street, Woodville is known locally as the Woodville Town Hall and has historical and architectural significant. The building was constructed in 1903 and features a rusticated foundation, red brick construction and a distinctive octagonal tower. The interior displays a high degree of craftsmanship in its retained interior woodwork. The building has historically been used as a gathering place by residents of Woodville and the surrounding rural hamlets for community events and is a local landmark as a key civic structure.

 121 King Street

121 King StreetDesignation By-law: 2010-093

 

121 King Street is one of the oldest and most ornate Victorian homes in Woodville and is an excellent and representative example of this building type. It features a Queen Anne style wraparound verandah on three sides which contains decorative brackets, gingerbread trims and railing and ornate stained glass windows. It has historical significance because of its associations with the Stoddart family and their funeral businesses in both Woodville and Victoria County more broadly which were, at one time, run from this house. The property forms part of the historic landscape of King Street in Woodville.

 124 King Street

124 King StreetDesignation By-law: 2019-094

 

124 King Street in Woodville is a good example of a Victorian vernacular residence. It is a red brick building with distinctive buff brick detailing that shows a high degree of craftsmanship. This detail includes the rusticated quoins and moulded window hoods. The property has historical and contextual significance in Woodville having been constructed by nineteenth century postmaster John Morrison for his daughter. It is a contributing property to the historic landscape of King Street in Woodville.

 145 King Street

145 King StreetDesignation By-law 2010-091

 

145 King Street is an excellent and unique example of a Victorian residential buildings. Constructed in 1867, the plans for the house came from Scotland and it was considered such an exemplary structure that a drawing of it appeared in the 1881 Victoria County Atlas. It includes a number of architecturally significant features including decorative gingerbread, bay windows, and decorative brick window surrounds. It has historical significance as the home of John Morrison, who served as Reeve of Eldon between 1860 and 1861 and was elected to the first Dominion Parliament as the representative for Victoria North.

 910 Hartley Road - Palestine Community Hall

Palestine Community HallDesignation By-law: 2019-010

 

The Palestine Community Hall is an excellent example of a rural one-room school house constructed around the turn of the century. The current structure was constructed in 1900 to replace an older 1877 building which was destroyed by a fire. It features the typical half-hip roof used on school houses of this type and retains its historic, and iconic belfry. The school is notable for its high level of craftsmanship on the windows which include coloured glass transoms and a decorative, arched window on the front elevation. The property has historical and contextual significance as the school for the local community and, after the closure of the school in 1964, the local community hall. It is a local landmark that is recognized throughout the area.

 

Heritage Conservation Districts

Heritage Conservation Districts are areas that form a cohesive streetscape or landscape with a shared history and shared characteristics. Districts can include streetscapes, groups of buildings, landscapes, and natural features. Designating an area as a district celebrates its historic character and ensures it is maintained.

Heritage Conservation Districts are identified through studies and are managed by a Heritage Conservation District plan which is written individually for each new district that is created. A District plan provides guidelines for management and growth within the designated area and advice for property owners to help them maintain the heritage character of their property.

Kawartha Lakes has two heritage conservation districts, each with its own guidelines and plan. You can explore the history of our conservation districts below and find out more about the guidelines for each. Our heritage conservation district plans are also available for consultation at the Economic Development Office and the Lindsay and Fenelon Falls branches of the Kawartha Lakes Public Library.

 Heritage Conservation Districts

 
 Downtown Lindsay

Downtown Lindsay encapsulates the history of the town. Kent Street is particularly distinctive because of its unusual width and its concentration of 19th and early 20th century buildings and terminal vista, with evidence of its military, commercial, and institutional history. The area’s heritage value lies in both its collection of individually important properties and its combination of these resources within a compact urban form. Downtown Lindsay has value as a district because of properties that represent key stages of the town’s development because the area is relatively unchanged, homogeneous and intact, and because it offers examples of some of the best buildings and commercial and institutional streetscapes in Lindsay.

 

The Downtown Lindsay Heritage Conservation District Study and Heritage Conservation District Plan provide more information on the district and its design guidelines.

 

Downtown Lindsay Heritage Conservation District map

 

We also offer an accessible boundary map description for Downtown Lindsay.

 Oak Street

Oak Street Heritage Conservation District in Fenelon Falls is a rare example of an early nineteenth century rural estate in the Kawartha Lakes that was redeveloped as a planned residential subdivision around the turn of the twentieth century. It has heritage value as a cohesive landscape comprised of the following key elements: part of a bur oak savannah which was incorporated into the rural estate; the original estate house and its immediate grounds; the planned subdivision of high quality Victorian and Edwardian homes along Oak Street; and the adjacent Trent-Severn Canal and former rail corridor. Oak Street’s overall heritage value lies in its collection of individually significant properties and its combination of these within a designed landscape.

 

The Oak Street Heritage Conservation District Study and Heritage Conservation District Plan provide more information on the district and its design guidelines.

 

Oak Street Heritage Conservation District map
 

 

We also offer an accessible boundary map description for Oak Street. 

 

Heritage Permits

Owners of designated properties, both individually designated and those located in Heritage Conservation Districts, are required to submit an application for a heritage permit prior to making changes to their property. The purpose of the heritage permit process is to ensure any changes are compatible with the heritage character of the property or district.

Our Heritage Permit Guidelines and Application Form outline the process for applying for a heritage permit as well as what changes do and do not require a permit. You are encouraged to meet with staff prior to submitting an application to discuss your proposed project.

 Colour Palette

Kawartha Lakes does not require property owners to paint their buildings specific colours and you are not required to get a permit to paint your building, unless you are intending to paint unpainted brick. We do have a recommended colour palette for historic properties that you are encouraged to use to help maintain the historic character of your building.
If you are intending to remove paint from brick, please contact the Economic Development Officer - Heritage Planning to discuss methods and best practices to ensure the longevity of your brick.

 Sign Guidelines

Buildings located in our Downtown Lindsay Heritage Conservation District are required to follow the signage requirements in our Downtown Lindsay Streetscape and Façade Guidelines. We also offer our Downtown Lindsay Signage Guidelines which provides guidance on acceptable signage. You must also apply for a heritage permit, using the Heritage Permit Application form, as well as a Sign Permit from our Building Department prior to installing new signage.

 

Heritage Register

The Ontario Heritage Act requires each municipality to keep a register of historic properties. Our Heritage Register is available in our Clerk’s Office and Economic Development Office for viewing and is also available for download. It includes individually designated properties, Heritage Conservation Districts and listed properties.

 Listed Properties

The Ontario Heritage Act allows municipalities to include properties on their Heritage Register which are not designated but have been identified as having heritage value to our communities. There are no restrictions on listed properties except that an owner is required to provide the municipality with 60 days notice if they would like to demolish the property. Owners of listed properties are not required to apply for a heritage permit prior to making alterations to their property.

 

In Kawartha Lakes, we have many properties which have heritage value. These properties are continually being identified, researched and added to the Heritage Register as listed properties. Listing helps protect our heritage properties while having few restrictions for property owners.

 

Resources for Property Owners

We offer a range of resources to assist property owners in the conservation of their heritage properties.

 Resources

 
 Heritage Contractors
The City maintains a database of local and regional contractors and tradespeople who work on heritage properties. Please be aware that this list is a resource only and does not constitute endorsement of any particular individual or business.
If you are a local contractor or tradesperson with experience on heritage properties and would like to be added to this list, please contact our office.
Kawartha Lakes Stories Map
Our Kawartha Lakes Stories Map highlights the history and stories of places throughout Kawartha Lakes. The map is interactive and allows you to explore and contribute to the diverse and evolving identity of our communities.
 Local Research Resources
 

There are a number of local and regional centres where property owners can research the history of their properties. These hold archival documents, including letters, plans, photos and maps, and secondary resources such as history books and articles. The archives below are all located in Kawartha Lakes and Peterborough. When visiting an archive, it is always advisable to call or email ahead of your planned visit.

 

Kawartha Lakes Public Library
The Kawartha Lakes Public Library holds a large collection of historical documents at its Lindsay branch, including historical photographs, local history books, directories, and newspapers. Local history books are also available at branches throughout the municipality. They have also digitized a large amount of material, including newspaper clippings and photographs.

 

Local Museums and Historical Societies

Kawartha Lakes in home to a number of local museums and historical societies with important collections relating to different communities throughout the municipality. It is important to call or email ahead of your visit to confirm seasonal hours and discuss your project. Some of our historical societies also publish newsletters and bulletins with information and new research on local history topics.

 

Trent Valley Archives

Trent Valley Archives holds a large collection of documents, photographs and books related to this history of the Trent Valley region, including both Peterborough and Kawartha Lakes. The Archives also publishes The Heritage Gazette of the Trent Valley, a quarterly publication with articles about local history.

 
Peterborough Museum and Archives

The Peterborough Museum and Archives holds a large collection of archival and photograph material related primary to the history of Peterborough, but which also includes material related to Kawartha Lakes. They have also digitized their collection of city and county directories, dating back to the mid-nineteenth century and includes volumes related to Victoria County.

 

Trent University Archives

Trent University Archives, located in Peterborough, is open to the public and holds a variety of documents related to the history of both Peterborough and Kawartha Lakes. It holds a number of important special collections relating to local topics of interest, the Trent Severn Waterway, Canadian history, exploration and settlement.

 

Kawartha Ancestral Research Association

The Kawartha Ancestral Research Association holds a large collection of genealogical and local history material related to Peterborough and Kawartha Lakes.

 Ontario Heritage Trust
The Ontario Heritage Trust is the provincial body that protects and promotes heritage in Ontario. The Trust provides important resources relating to heritage conservation, including a database of designated properties and conservation advice. It also owns and runs a number of historic sites in Ontario and organizes various events related to our history in the province.
 National Trust for Canada
The National Trust for Canada is a national organization dedicated to the promotion and preservation of historic sites across the country. It provides education, advocacy, resources and support for Canadian historic sites.
 Doors Open Ontario
Doors Open Ontario is an annual event that takes place in communities across the province each year where sites, many of which are not normally open to the public, are opened for you to explore. Details of each community’s event are available beginning around February of each year.
 Ontario Heritage Toolkit
The Ontario Heritage Toolkit is a series of publications from the Ministry of Heritage, Sport, Tourism and Culture Industries that provides information about the heritage designation process in Ontario. These documents explore in-depth how to protect heritage resources in Ontario.
 Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada
The Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada is a federal document that outlines best practices in heritage conservation. It was developed by Parks Canada to provide practical and helpful advice for approaching heritage conservation projects.
 Canadian Register of Historic Places
The Canadian Register of Historic Places in an online database of historic sites across Canada.

 

Osprey Heritage Awards

Every other year, the Municipal Heritage Committee holds its Osprey Heritage Awards to recognize individuals, groups, and businesses in our communities who have contributed to heritage preservation. The next intake for the Osprey Heritage Awards will be in 2020.

Nominations for Municipal Heritage Committee Osprey Heritage Awards

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